Hacking Online Dating

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab. Link to read me page with more information. Her TED talk, about the future of data and algorithms, has been viewed 7 million times, translated into 32 languages and was part of Delta Airline’s in-flight entertainment. Amy Webb is a quantitative futurist and a bestselling, award-winning author. She was also a Delegate on the former U. Her books have been translated into 19 different languages. A lifelong science fiction fan, Amy collaborates closely with Hollywood writers and producers on films, TV shows and commercials about science, technology and the future. She is a frequent guest on television shows and podcasts. Amy Webb is represented exclusively by Stern Speakers. Please be in touch with Danny Stern at danny sternstrategy.

Why data is the secret to successful dating

Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating. So, as any fan of data would do: she started making a spreadsheet. Hear the story of how she went on to hack her online dating life — with frustrating, funny and life-changing results. Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.

Join 1. Amy Webb: How I hacked online dating.

Amy Webb advises CXOs of the world’s most-admired companies, three-star and heart wrenching memoir about data, algorithms and online dating (Data.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we’ll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer – no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. Anyone who uses online dating sites must read her funny, fascinating book. Using her gift for data strategy, she found which keywords were digital-man magnets, analyzed photos, and then adjusted her female profile to make the most of that intel.

Then began the deluge—dozens of men who actually met her own stringent requirements wanted to meet her. Among them: her future husband, now the father of her child.

Data, A Love Story by Amy Webb

Amy Webb heads the digital strategy house Webbmedia Group, and is a founder of the SparkCamp discussion series. So my name is Amy Webb, and a few years ago I found myself at the end of yet another fantastic relationship that came burning down in a spectacular fashion. So I asked everybody in my life what they thought. And most importantly, true love will find you when you least expect it.

Amy Webb took a new approach to online dating: gaming the system to find a partner. See how she did it – and find out how to create our own.

These days, we’re promised true love via algorithm. Log on to a website, enter in some data and — voila! Algorithm is really just a fancy name for the step-by-step process and calculations that are used while solving a problem. Think of an algorithm as you would a recipe for croissants. You need a set of ingredients: yeast, water, sugar, salt, flour, milk, oil, butter, and eggs.

And you need a bunch of kitchen equipment: bowls, mixers, knife, baking sheet, oven, and some towels. Depending on how you put everything together, you could wind up with a flaky, delicate pastry or a hard lump of charred dough. Algorithms are a shorthand way of writing out workflows. They’re the step-by-step processes scientists use to think through complex problems, and the instructions that are given to computers to help process the results.

Data, a love story : how I gamed online dating to meet my match / Amy Webb.

Founder of the Future Today Institute, a leading foresight and strategy firm that helps leaders and their organizations prepare for complex futures, Amy Webb pioneered a data-driven, technology-led foresight methodology that is now used within hundreds of organizations. She was elected a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She was also a Delegate on the former U. A lifelong science fiction fan, Amy Webb collaborates closely with Hollywood writers and producers on films, TV shows and commercials about science, technology and the future.

If that sounds familiar, then you’ll relate to Amy Webb’s story, in which she tries and fails in online dating – and tries again. And this time, she does those matching.

Look Inside. Jan 31, Minutes Buy. Anyone who uses online dating sites must read her funny, fascinating book. Using her gift for data strategy, she found which keywords were digital-man magnets, analyzed photos, and then adjusted her female profile to make the most of that intel. Then began the deluge—dozens of men who actually met her own stringent requirements wanted to meet her.

Among them: her future husband, now the father of her child. Not Cats. Must not like Cats! Next she turned to her own profile. In order to craft the most compelling online presentation, she needed to assess the competition—so she signed on to JDate again, this time as a man. Then began the deluge—dozens of men wanted to meet her, men who actually met her requirements. Forty million people date online each year. Thanks to Data, a Love Story , their odds just got a whole lot better.

Amy Webb is an award-winning journalist who wrote for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and other publications before founding Webbmedia Group, a digital-strategy consultancy that works with Fortune companies, major media companies and foundations, the government, and others.

Follow the Author

By Bill Sobel Aug 1, Amy Webb understands data. But that’s just the start of the interesting things about her. Webb is a digital media futurist and founder of Webbmedia Group , a digital strategy agency that spots near-term emerging technology trends and develops strategies for media organizations, Fortune and companies, large nonprofits, universities and government agencies.

She’s also the co-founder of Spark Camp , which Fast Company described as “the ultimate summer camp for influencers” only it actually happens year round.

Amy Webb heads the digital strategy house Webbmedia Group, and is a founder of the SparkCamp discussion series. She’s the author of “Data: A Love Story.”.

This wasn’t a part of the plan. At age 30, I was still single and had no exciting prospects. Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds. Photos: Why Amy’s online search for love worked. Similar dislikes — Amy and her husband, Brian, have coffee in Baltimore. Her algorithm helped pinpoint their shared interests, which don’t include sports! Hide Caption. Similar work ethic — Brian and Amy share the same attitude toward work, she said.

Similar inspirations — Brian proposes in Petra, Jordan.

Online dating and a formula for love

The question of how love works has bedeviled writers and scientists for centuries. But how do the dynamics of romance differ in the age of online dating? And these days, algorithms, too. After a series of bad dates following a major heartbreak, mathematically-driven Amy decided to take a quantitative approach to the playing field and started systematically recording various data points about her dates, revealing some important correlations. After one particularly bad date, she decided to formalize the exercise and wrote down everything that was important to her in a mate — from intellectual overlap to acceptable amount of body hair — eventually coming up with 72 attributes that she was going to demand in any future date.

She then broke down these attributes into two tiers and developed a scoring system, assigning specific points to each.

Feb 23, – Amy Webb: How I hacked online dating Wonderfully nerdy online dating success stories, inspired by Amy Webb’s TED Talk on the algorithm.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page.

Data, a Love Story

Annette Powers. In it, I was meant to document my online dating adventures. So I embarked into this new world of virtual trolling. There were weeks when I went on a blind date every night.

Amy Webb took online dating algorithms into her own hands; 72 characteristics helped define Webb’s ideal mate; Webb posed as a male.

We also have a chat, just for us. You first have to register here, then click on this link and join okchat. Be sure to use your Reddit username so other users can recognize you! She’s crazy for sure. She’s our beloved online dating “scientist. Well, she seems to have done a lot of personal experimentation to come to the same conclusions that this subreddit espouses daily.

All she did was post nicer pictures and make a more lively profile. She was just lucky to find someone online. It wasn’t anything she specifically did. Where the heck do these people come from?

TED Talks: Amy Webb Hacks Online Dating!

Jump to navigation. Videos, interviews, and audio recordings of previous Signature Events at the Library. I’m a geek; I love math and data and statistics. The idea of tackling online dating using statistical analysis and profile optimization is intriguing.

and Goodreads. (view spoiler)[Amy Webb is a brilliant statistician and has her own company so developing the correct algorithms to analyse online dating profiles.

Ted Talks is easily one of my favourite portals to watching and listening great speakers talk about hugely interesting topics, but in a simple way to explain to those less.. Through a series of lists, prioritising and scoring 72 points to be exact , Amy stated a score of was the minimum at which she would date someone. Oppositely, Webb analysed the opinion people were having on her profile and learnt that the most popular people on dating sites, where those who described themselves in smaller paragraphs, with more optimistic wording and came across more approachable.

Once Amy made the changes to her profile, the emails started coming through! Marketeers could take tips from this to reach customers. At the end of the day, dating and purchasing do correlate.

Digital Dating: Why You Should Say Yes to Maybe